viewing stuff

Jan 25

Reblog this if you think ABC should renew Happy Endings for another season

walrus-tm:

image

(Source: walrustm, via fuckkyeahhappyendings)

Dec 14

[video]

Dec 11

[video]

Sep 21

"International Book Week"

And this is Trinidad.
It’s international book week. The rules: Grab the closest book to you, turn to page 52, post the 5th sentence as your status. Don’t name the title. Copy the rules as part of your post.
Aside: So apparently this is not a official thing but a (fun) internet meme. Also, my closest book is the ebook I’ve got open on my laptop. Does that count? I say yes.

Apr 22

howtobeterrell:

I need someone to write a story based on black mermaids and their help in saving black captives who attempted suicide by jumping overboard during the slave trade. I need this book written. I need it to have some Yoruba feels to it. I need it. and then I need a film based on it.


Not exactly what the OP is requesting but I recently read The New Moon’s Arms, a novel by Nalo Hopkinson. The main story is interspersed with an origin story for the Caribbean monk seals, positing that they were originally black captives who were transformed by a goddess and who have survived to the present day.
Here’s more about it from the author herself:
http://nalohopkinson.com/writing/fiction/books/new_moons_arms

howtobeterrell:

I need someone to write a story based on black mermaids and their help in saving black captives who attempted suicide by jumping overboard during the slave trade. I need this book written. I need it to have some Yoruba feels to it. I need it. and then I need a film based on it.

Not exactly what the OP is requesting but I recently read The New Moon’s Arms, a novel by Nalo Hopkinson. The main story is interspersed with an origin story for the Caribbean monk seals, positing that they were originally black captives who were transformed by a goddess and who have survived to the present day.

Here’s more about it from the author herself:

http://nalohopkinson.com/writing/fiction/books/new_moons_arms

(Source: irieli)

Nov 26

[video]

Oct 10

wildunicornherd:

invisiblemoose:

This is the best metaphor for the patriarchy I’ve ever seen.

In the conclusion to a week-long series, Sinfest heroine Monique takes the red pill and discovers the patriarchy. (Click through to the full-sized version—the strings of falling letters spell out things like “male gaze”, “check out that piece”, “boys don’t cry”, “crazy cat lady”, and “what about the men?”.)

wildunicornherd:

invisiblemoose:

This is the best metaphor for the patriarchy I’ve ever seen.

In the conclusion to a week-long series, Sinfest heroine Monique takes the red pill and discovers the patriarchy. (Click through to the full-sized version—the strings of falling letters spell out things like “male gaze”, “check out that piece”, “boys don’t cry”, “crazy cat lady”, and “what about the men?”.)

Jul 29

[video]

Jul 21

wildunicornherd:

fuckyeahtoronto:

fggtlibrarian: Toronto’s Mayor Rob Ford has launched a review of all city services as a prelude to a massive Toronto budget-slashing plan. Please help prevent the privatization of the Toronto Public Library, and sign the petition at http://ourpubliclibrary.to/

What I wrote:

Hi, Cllr. Perks, the Executive Committee, and Mayor Ford.
I’m disturbed by the prevailing mindset that the benefit of a service consists only in its short-term monetary profit. Saving the City money this year is good — but there are other kinds of benefits that you need to consider.
One such benefit is cultural development: what makes Toronto Toronto, and not Montreal or Vancouver or Halifax; what draws people here to visit or stay; what makes people proud to live here. And libraries are a potent driving force. In the Parkdale branch, I can find books by Torontonian authors who would be underrepresented at Chapters or Indigo. My library hosts musical events, voting booths, a community information centre, and a program where (excellent) local authors mentor and work with youth. My other favourite libraries include Lillian H. Smith, home of the Merril Collection — the largest science fiction collection in the world, named after a groundbreaking author who came to call Toronto home — and the Reference Library, where I once swing-danced till dawn on Nuit Blanche, then took the night bus (another service potentially on the chopping block!) to work.
Another sort of benefit is long-term results. The education that libraries provide does not have an instant payoff — but no education worth acquiring does. It is in the public interest to have well-educated citizens, and one of the easiest ways to ensure this happens is to make resources like books and computers as accessible as possible. I have to pay to get into the AGO [art gallery] or the ROM [museum], but at the library I can read all the books I want for free.
A third benefit is far less tangible, infinitely fragile, and possibly the most important of all: freedom. Librarians tend to care passionately about freedom of expression and information. These principles, unfortunately, cannot be preserved by market forces. Promoting them, as librarians do, ought to be considered an essential service.
tl:dr; By cutting library services we’ll be shooting ourselves in the foot.
Thanks,
N. P.

wildunicornherd:

fuckyeahtoronto:

fggtlibrarianToronto’s Mayor Rob Ford has launched a review of all city services as a prelude to a massive Toronto budget-slashing plan. Please help prevent the privatization of the Toronto Public Library, and sign the petition at http://ourpubliclibrary.to/

What I wrote:

Hi, Cllr. Perks, the Executive Committee, and Mayor Ford.

I’m disturbed by the prevailing mindset that the benefit of a service consists only in its short-term monetary profit. Saving the City money this year is good — but there are other kinds of benefits that you need to consider.

One such benefit is cultural development: what makes Toronto Toronto, and not Montreal or Vancouver or Halifax; what draws people here to visit or stay; what makes people proud to live here. And libraries are a potent driving force. In the Parkdale branch, I can find books by Torontonian authors who would be underrepresented at Chapters or Indigo. My library hosts musical events, voting booths, a community information centre, and a program where (excellent) local authors mentor and work with youth. My other favourite libraries include Lillian H. Smith, home of the Merril Collection — the largest science fiction collection in the world, named after a groundbreaking author who came to call Toronto home — and the Reference Library, where I once swing-danced till dawn on Nuit Blanche, then took the night bus (another service potentially on the chopping block!) to work.

Another sort of benefit is long-term results. The education that libraries provide does not have an instant payoff — but no education worth acquiring does. It is in the public interest to have well-educated citizens, and one of the easiest ways to ensure this happens is to make resources like books and computers as accessible as possible. I have to pay to get into the AGO [art gallery] or the ROM [museum], but at the library I can read all the books I want for free.

A third benefit is far less tangible, infinitely fragile, and possibly the most important of all: freedom. Librarians tend to care passionately about freedom of expression and information. These principles, unfortunately, cannot be preserved by market forces. Promoting them, as librarians do, ought to be considered an essential service.

tl:dr; By cutting library services we’ll be shooting ourselves in the foot.

Thanks,

N. P.

(Source: hq76o261984)

Jul 16

[video]